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Consumers Are Looking for These 3 Digital Banking Services

Community banks have a lot of advantages over their larger counterparts, but that’s no reason to slack on technology. Regardless of the size of the bank, consumers expect certain digital banking services. Luckily for smaller banks and credit unions, the latest Benchmarks reveal that most households and businesses assume smaller institutions have about the same quality digital tools as the largest banks. Beyond delivering amazing customer service and employing strong community engagement practices, be sure these digital banking services are up to speed:

  1. Mobile Banking

A rapidly growing percent of consumers want everything accessible on a mobile device. The latest CES Banking Benchmarks reveal that 64% of consumers expect to increase their mobile and online banking in the next 12 months. Although you want your customers to feel comfortable coming into the branch, they shouldn’t have to come in for routine transactions if they don’t want to. Remote transfer, bill pay, and remote deposit have grown by up to 35% per year at some of the more proactive institutions. Person-to-person (P2P) payments are also more popular than ever, with friends using Venmo and PayPal to cover a shared cab rather than exchange cash. It’s essential that your mobile app can communicate with the preferred apps of your consumers, making every monetary transaction as easy as possible.

  1. Financial Planning

Consumers want more from their bank than the exchange of money. Financial planning is high on the list of what community banks should be offering, and this shouldn’t be limited to an in-person visit with a representative. Give your consumers the freedom to use files stored on their personal devices to make comparisons with your website or app. Budgeting, loan calculators, and tax preparation are only a few financial planning tools that are valuable to your customers. And once they start using these tools with your bank, they are far more likely to use your value-added services in the future.

  1. Online Account Management

Community banks can’t afford to forget about basic account management services. There’s nothing more annoying than having to fill out paperwork for something like a change of mailing address when it should be something the customer can do online. Allow your consumers the flexibility to make changes to their account digitally, without the hassle of paperwork or a trip to your branch. It should be easy to change contact information, switch mailing addresses, and check balances of different accounts. It may seem like common sense, especially since convenience is valuable to your consumer base, but these basic functions are often overlooked or not properly developed.

Bank technology is easily available, and it doesn’t take much to implement tools that make a difference to your customers.  An oft-forgotten aspect of employing banking technology is how important it is to educate your own employees on how to use them.  If your employees do not know how to use the technology you offer your customers, you can be assured that your customers question how good your bank really is if the employees don’t know how to bank there. During the interviews CES conducts for the Benchmarks, we see thousands of comments from customers who question the quality of their bank when they believe the bank’s staff themselves are not expert users of the banks’ technology.

An investment in digital banking services is no longer an option if your community bank wants to remain competitive. Community banks should always leverage their unique position as a member of the local community, but they must also deliver the level of functionality consumers expect from every bank large or small.

There is enormous opportunity for you to grow your community bank or credit union, but it starts with knowing what existing customers and prospects think of you compared to your competitors. Take action now and request our benchmark study for your region.

7 Secrets to Providing a Better Community Bank Customer Experience

Technology has done much to level the playing field between big banks and small community banks and credit unions. Digital interfaces are available to every business, regardless of size, which leaves the battle over customers to be fought in a different realm. It is customer experience that is more important than ever, and community banks need to leverage from these 7 secrets, to gain advantage over the competition.

  1. Don’t fear technology.

Big banks have done the hard work of mainstreaming technology, so don’t let this be your downfall. Technology assists in providing customers with the integrated experience they expect from businesses, and your bank is no different. Even the smallest bank or credit union is more than capable of capitalizing on the software that is available in the marketplace.

  1. Unify all touch-points.

The customer experience is not linear. Customers may complete a single financial task using multiple touch-points, and they all must connect seamlessly. Those who use your bank should be able to access their balances easily via mobile app, discuss financial decisions with an expert by phone or at a physical branch, and keep track of their finances on a desktop computer. Every form of communication needs to be instantly responsive to the needs of every customer.

  1. Create a comfortable atmosphere.

Digital components to your community bank are crucial, but the atmosphere of your physical locations still matters. Even as you integrate each touch-point, you  want to avoid making your community bank feel like a sterile government office. When your customers do pop in, they want to feel welcomed. Lighting makes a huge difference, and you could easily swap stiff chairs for comfortable couches and friendly décor.  Some leading institutions are even experimenting with olfactory ambiance to help customers feel more comfortable.

  1. Empower through training.

Staff training is often what makes the difference between a growing business and a dwindling one.  When we interview hundreds of thousands of banking customers, we learn that poor staff training is typically the #1 or #2 reason that people decide to switch banks.   When your employees have and understand all the relevant product and service information about your community bank, they can better serve your customers. Staff should be able to answer customer questions, and with a solid understanding of existing technology, your staff can teach customers how to search for answers that they don’t readily have.

  1. Build a culture of customer service.

When the customer is central to every process, your staff can provide superior customer experience. This tenet starts at the top, with upper-management implementing processes that enable frontline staff to solve issues immediately for customers, rather than always having to refer the problem to a manager.  Our surveys reveal that 27% of customers report getting the runaround when trying to get questions answered.  For businesses, this increases to 35%.  And in both cases, getting the runaround is a major reason households and businesses tell us they might switch banks.  If you prioritize the customer and their experience from every angle, you achieve an approach that naturally eliminates most of the problems they face.

  1. Personalize your service.

Your overall infrastructure may be amazing, but customers need help marrying their needs to your products and services. It is not a case of “If you build it, they will come.”  Community banks are in an amazing position to be able to learn about the unique needs of their patrons, and then provide them with the tools and advice to meet those needs. A familiar smile, remembering their names, and recalling that they are in the process of purchasing a home, for instance, can build lifelong relationships.

  1. Contribute to the community.

The customer experience is driven by your involvement in the community. Many customers want to know that you are aware of what is relevant to those that live there. Sponsor local teams and celebrate regional traditions. Reinforce that you are an important part of the community.  This will improve your own customer loyalty and will actually attract more business, especially from middle market and small businesses in your area.  And do not feel shy about promoting your good works.  Our surveys show that when a community contribution is accompanied by marketing spend to promote it, the impact to the bottom line can grow by more than 350%.

Community banks and credit unions have unique strengths. If you want to offer a truly impactful customer experience, you have to offer personalization that is also convenient. Your frontline staff must be fully trained and confident enough to offer financial knowledge in addition to providing account services.  Your electronic banking should be an extension of that service, not a replacement for it.   A concerted, thoughtful examination of your processes, and more importantly, an unblinking understanding of your current customers’ opinions of the bank will enable you to excel beyond your peers.

Winners & Losers

2.28 Million Northeast Households and Businesses to Switch Banks this Year

Banking New England Sept/Oct 2018
Published on Oct 16, 2018

In this special marketing issue, learn how to optimize your mobile site, understand why customers can be easily enticed to switch banks, and get an inside look at the New England Financial Marketing Association conference, featuring an article by Bruce Paul.

How Community Banks Can Capitalize on Advantages to Beat Big Banks

Community banks are constantly competing against big banks. To remain relevant, it’s critical that community banks find and capitalize on the competitive edge their unique positions offer. It’s impossible to play the same game as big banks and expect to win. However, with a unique strategy that leverages the advantages offered by community banks and credit unions, customers can be drawn to a local choice.

Community banks can offer customized services for a better banking experience.

Larger banks do what they can to provide a well-rounded service, but it’s a cookie-cutter approach that forces local branches of large banks to conform across regions, not taking into account differences in the local communities they serve. Large banks are rarely attuned to the needs of the individual banking customer, focusing more on quantity than quality. But customers of every generation, from Baby Boomers to Generation Zers, want a trusted financial advisor. They don’t want a pamphlet on services or a web page on APRs. They want their bank to know who they are and what they personally need to do to improve and manage their finances.

Continue reading “How Community Banks Can Capitalize on Advantages to Beat Big Banks”

Community Bank Challenges: Is Technology Your Achilles’ Heel?

Community banks and credit unions often believe their strengths lie anywhere but with technology. Given the variety of personal interactions in demand by customers, it may seem unlikely that technology shortcomings would be harmful. Unfortunately, even the best customer service cannot make up for a lack of the tech-based services that customers expect in their desire to make transactional banking easier and faster. Yet, most community banks and credit unions do have the technology they need to compete. So where is the issue?

Technology is rarely the problem.

Technology is rarely the problem, but how it is implemented and presented to customers certainly can be. A community bank may think that a basic technology package is all they need, but you can’t just introduce technology and walk away. While offering online banking services and mobile banking services is important, your customers must know how to use the technology, or it can become a source of frustration, causing some customers to defect.

Continue reading “Community Bank Challenges: Is Technology Your Achilles’ Heel?”