Insights from our Recent Bank Benchmark Surveys

Customer Experience Solutions, LLC conducts a comprehensive scientific statewide survey of banking customers twice per year, in Spring and Fall. The Customer Benchmark focuses on how your customers rate your bank, and how those ratings compare to your competition. The Prospect Benchmark focuses on how your prospects (non-customers) view your bank and how you might gain their business. We gather millions of ratings from your customers and your competitors’ customers every year.

The 2018 results have just come out across the Northeast, and here are some of the latest findings:

  • Technology is becoming less and less of a differentiator. Over time, we have seen customers’ perceptions change as they relate to technology. Five or six years ago, customers assumed there was a big gap between big banks and small banks in terms of technology and the use of digital tools. While that still exists to some extent, that gap has closed significantly. As a matter of fact, in most local markets in the Northeast, there is at least one community bank that is rated higher than most national, super-regional, and regional banks in that market. Contact us and let us tell you if you are that bank.
  • Technology is more about convenience than saving money. While that might seem obvious, it is important to know that banked adults across the region are conducting more and more financial transactions electronically. That does not, however, diminish the importance they place on relationships with the bank. As a matter of fact, this trend toward electronic banking is benefiting a lot of community banks that see it as a way to eliminate the more trivial interactions, and to embrace the fact that the in-person interactions are now much more valuable because they are far more likely to be on a subject that is substantive and truly important to the customer. Whereas most community banker-customer interactions were transactional ten years ago, the majority of banker-customer interactions are now focused on solving problems, planning, or creating greater financial well-being.
  • The vast majority of customers do not want a 100% transactional relationship with their banks. They want proactivity instead. Proactivity is one of the key drivers of customer service in the eyes of customers. They increasingly want a bank that will suggest new ideas and products. And contrary to popular belief among community banks, customers are willing to tolerate a little bit of pushiness from time to time, if they sometimes see the positive outcomes . The key issue is about striking the right balance. For example, in the latest benchmarks for New York State, 9% of customers said their banks were too pushy, but 29% said their banks were not proactive enough. These numbers can vary from bank to bank, so it is important to know where you stand with your customers. But the lesson is clear: Erring on the side of passivity is not a good way to satisfy your customers or grow your market share.
  • Customers need to feel secure. Bank security is a big deal today, so your customers should always know that you are using cutting-edge security protocols to keep their information safe. But you should also make them feel secure in their decision to bank with you by being knowledgeable – not just about checking and savings accounts but about all of their financial needs, from investing to mortgages to annuities. This is very clear from the latest benchmark results in New Jersey. A full 7% of banked adults said that they did not feel their money was safe at their current primary bank. For the banks that ranked higher than this, fixing this perception is a matter of survival.

There is enormous opportunity for you to improve your ability to grow your community bank or credit union, but it starts with knowing what existing customers and prospects think of you compared to your competitors. Take action now and request our benchmark study for your region.

One response to “Insights from our Recent Bank Benchmark Surveys”

  1. […] Our ad recall research has even shown that although adults can correctly identify the intent of tech-focused bank ads like billboards, they usually can’t recall which bank the ad was for. So as a result, consumers are simply getting the message: banks are good at technology.  This results in wasted marketing dollars that could be put to better use on a more effective initiative. Your larger competitors are improving the image of technology within the banking industry, which allows community banks to benefit from the net impression that all banks have strong technology. […]

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