The Factor that Impacts Bank Customer Loyalty the Most

The latest Banking Benchmarks came out the end of January, and there were clear indicators about overall banking strategies community bank and credit union managers should employ to maintain and grow in their markets. To understand where your bank specifically rates and ranks vs local competitors, be sure to request yours.

The One Factor that Determines Loyalty Above All

The most recent Benchmarks reflect that the most important differentiator community banks and credit unions have is their ability to deliver excellent customer experience.

CESCX Bank Customer Loyalty

Out of more than a million reviews, only about one-third of households and business can be classified as loyal. Loyalty is down significantly over the past 18 months. 

How Do We Measure Bank Loyalty?

Loyal consumers are those that have given the vast majority of their banking business to just one bank and are planning on giving the vast majority of their future business to the same bank.  These are customers or members that, barring any big unexpected problems, are going to be with you for at least the next 5 years. Statistically speaking, it is impossible to predict out longer than 5 years because of vagaries in the economy, people moving, changing jobs, etc.

What Can My Bank Do to Improve Customer Experience?

To improve your community bank customer service experience and generate more loyalty from your bank customers, we recommend this 7-step approach:

1. Compete with technology.

Customers expect even the smallest banks to compete well on technology. It’s an expectation, so if you fall short, you will lose share. But because technology is so ubiquitous, it also cannot be what you hinge your differentiation on. You need it, but you need more.

2. Consistency from every touchpoint.

No matter how your customer reaches you – phone, website, drive-through, walk-in, phone call – every experience should feel seamless and focused. Everyone should be on the same page about your services, and every single person who has any potential of coming into contact with your customers should deliver exceptional customer service and know how to use all of your technology.

3. Make your bank customers feel welcome.

Don’t forget the community in your community bank. When customers do walk in, they aren’t looking for an austere, corporate climate. They want smiling faces and people who know them by name.

4. Your employees should know how to bank at your bank.

As we interviewed thousands of banking customers, we discovered that staff training is typically one of the top reasons that people decide to switch banks.  Your staff – all of them – should be able to answer questions and demonstrate a clear understanding of existing technology.

5. Build a culture of customer service.

Nearly all bank managers think they prioritize service, but our surveys reveal that at least a third of customers report getting the runaround. Getting the runaround is a major reason households and businesses tell us they want to switch banks. Customer service has to be a culture in your bank from the top down.

6. Get personal.

What sets community banks and credit unions apart from big banks is that they can compete technologically while still being personal. When your banker is also your neighbor, has kids in the same schools, and understands the challenges of your specific community, it makes a difference.

7. Community involvement.

The customer experience is driven by your involvement in the community. Sponsor local teams and celebrate regional traditions. Reinforce that you are an important part of the community. And take every opportunity to promote what you do. Our surveys show that when a community contribution is accompanied by marketing spend to promote it, the impact to the bottom line can grow by more than 350%.

Want to know the specifics about your bank?

To understand where your bank specifically rates and ranks vs local competitors, be sure to request your benchmarks.

Customer Experience Solutions Benchmarks Highlighted in Banking Mid Atlantic

As the most recent banking benchmarks reflect, the most important differentiator community banks and credit unions have is their ability to deliver an excellent customer experience. When bank customers feel valued, listened to, and cared about at their bank, not even better rates can pull them away. Unfortunately, only a little more than one-third of the banking customers surveyed (over one million responses) are “highly loyal.”

This means two-thirds of banking customers throughout the northeast market are looking for a new bank. To make sure your customers aren’t the ones looking – and to attract the ones who are looking – you need to understand what your customers and prospects think of your bank.

New benchmarks are now available – request yours now.

Read the highlights about New Jersey’s and Pennsylvania’s banking benchmarks in the winter 2019 edition of Banking Mid Atlantic.

 

 

7 Secrets to Providing a Better Community Bank Customer Experience

Technology has done much to level the playing field between big banks and small community banks and credit unions. Digital interfaces are available to every business, regardless of size, which leaves the battle over customers to be fought in a different realm. It is customer experience that is more important than ever, and community banks need to leverage from these 7 secrets, to gain advantage over the competition.

  1. Don’t fear technology.

Big banks have done the hard work of mainstreaming technology, so don’t let this be your downfall. Technology assists in providing customers with the integrated experience they expect from businesses, and your bank is no different. Even the smallest bank or credit union is more than capable of capitalizing on the software that is available in the marketplace.

  1. Unify all touch-points.

The customer experience is not linear. Customers may complete a single financial task using multiple touch-points, and they all must connect seamlessly. Those who use your bank should be able to access their balances easily via mobile app, discuss financial decisions with an expert by phone or at a physical branch, and keep track of their finances on a desktop computer. Every form of communication needs to be instantly responsive to the needs of every customer.

  1. Create a comfortable atmosphere.

Digital components to your community bank are crucial, but the atmosphere of your physical locations still matters. Even as you integrate each touch-point, you  want to avoid making your community bank feel like a sterile government office. When your customers do pop in, they want to feel welcomed. Lighting makes a huge difference, and you could easily swap stiff chairs for comfortable couches and friendly décor.  Some leading institutions are even experimenting with olfactory ambiance to help customers feel more comfortable.

  1. Empower through training.

Staff training is often what makes the difference between a growing business and a dwindling one.  When we interview hundreds of thousands of banking customers, we learn that poor staff training is typically the #1 or #2 reason that people decide to switch banks.   When your employees have and understand all the relevant product and service information about your community bank, they can better serve your customers. Staff should be able to answer customer questions, and with a solid understanding of existing technology, your staff can teach customers how to search for answers that they don’t readily have.

  1. Build a culture of customer service.

When the customer is central to every process, your staff can provide superior customer experience. This tenet starts at the top, with upper-management implementing processes that enable frontline staff to solve issues immediately for customers, rather than always having to refer the problem to a manager.  Our surveys reveal that 27% of customers report getting the runaround when trying to get questions answered.  For businesses, this increases to 35%.  And in both cases, getting the runaround is a major reason households and businesses tell us they might switch banks.  If you prioritize the customer and their experience from every angle, you achieve an approach that naturally eliminates most of the problems they face.

  1. Personalize your service.

Your overall infrastructure may be amazing, but customers need help marrying their needs to your products and services. It is not a case of “If you build it, they will come.”  Community banks are in an amazing position to be able to learn about the unique needs of their patrons, and then provide them with the tools and advice to meet those needs. A familiar smile, remembering their names, and recalling that they are in the process of purchasing a home, for instance, can build lifelong relationships.

  1. Contribute to the community.

The customer experience is driven by your involvement in the community. Many customers want to know that you are aware of what is relevant to those that live there. Sponsor local teams and celebrate regional traditions. Reinforce that you are an important part of the community.  This will improve your own customer loyalty and will actually attract more business, especially from middle market and small businesses in your area.  And do not feel shy about promoting your good works.  Our surveys show that when a community contribution is accompanied by marketing spend to promote it, the impact to the bottom line can grow by more than 350%.

Community banks and credit unions have unique strengths. If you want to offer a truly impactful customer experience, you have to offer personalization that is also convenient. Your frontline staff must be fully trained and confident enough to offer financial knowledge in addition to providing account services.  Your electronic banking should be an extension of that service, not a replacement for it.   A concerted, thoughtful examination of your processes, and more importantly, an unblinking understanding of your current customers’ opinions of the bank will enable you to excel beyond your peers.

How Can Your Community Bank Outgrow Competitors by 100%?

Did you know that one of the biggest ways you can become more competitive as a community bank is to provide a better customer experience and better customer service? It seems simple, doesn’t it? Just give great service, provide a great experience, and watch your business grow. But of course, only one bank per community can actually be #1.

Unfortunately, providing exceptional customer service is not as simple as it seems for a number of reasons. But the biggest reason community banks and credit unions aren’t competing more effectively is that about 95% of them believe that they’re already giving the best customer service and experience. This problem is compounded by the disconnect that happens between what banks say and what they do. Ninety-six percent of bank CEOs say that customer experience is a top priority; however, when you ask on-the-ground managers who are charged with providing that experience, only 40% say that the customer experience is actually a day-to-day priority at their banks.

What We Know about Your Bank Customers that You Might Not Know

Your customers don’t always complain. How do we know? We ask them. When we collect the hundreds of thousands of ratings directly from customers to form our benchmarks, we ask them whether or not they have experienced a significant problem with their banks in the last 6 months. On average, 13% of those customers across the Northeast said that they had, and at the individual bank or branch level, the percentage was as high as 40%. The problems ranged from errors on statements to mobile app issues to rude tellers.

We asked the customers surveyed if they had told their banks about the problems they had experienced. The sobering truth is that over 50% of them said that they had not told their banks. That means they are upset with their banks, but they are keeping it to themselves. Quite often, this makes customers susceptible to the  next $200 offer to open an account elsewhere. They may even be actively looking to end their relationships in their entirety. As every banker knows, customers almost never say goodbye; they simply stop engaging. They open new accounts elsewhere, and they slowly draw down their balances until the banks are left with empty sleeper accounts. In 2017, 11% of US consumers changed their primary banks, and almost never did their banks see it coming until it was too late.

The way to understand the satisfaction—and vulnerability—of your customer base is not actually that difficult: you ask them. On a regular basis. You can do that internally, by recurrently surveying a representative sample of your customers. The drawback with that method is what is called respondent bias. If you ask 1,000 of your customers for their feedback via a mail survey, an email survey, or a phone survey, who do you think will respond? The very happy customers will respond. The very unhappy customers will respond. But the ones in the middle are far less likely to respond, so the result is a partial view of your customer feedback at best and a highly inaccurate one at worst.

A better and more accurate way of gathering customer experience feedback is by using a third-party, objective source that does more than survey the happiest and unhappiest customers. This can be done by targeting all customers (your and your competitors’) though a random population survey. In that way, happy customers, unhappy customers, and everyone in between are proportionately likely to give their feedback. You end up with a far-more accurate, far-less skewed picture of your customer base. This approach has the added advantage of possibly providing your results in comparison to your competitors, so you can see if you really are beating the competition. This approach is also typically much cheaper than a single-bank approach, since the costs are shared across many banks. On the flip side, the disadvantage is that you typically cannot customize the individual questions if you have a large market research department that prefers to create and distribute its own surveys.

Delivering on Customer Service

Your bank can grow 100% faster than the competition if you simply focus on delivering exceptional customer experiences. But you can’t just assume your bank is already doing that. Nearly 95% of banks think they are exceeding their customers’ expectations and doing so better than the competitor across the street. But such an assumption is not based on fact. There is enormous opportunity to improve your ability to grow your community bank or credit union, but it starts with knowing what existing customers and prospects think of you compared to your competitors. Take action now and request our benchmark study for your region.