Consumers Are Looking for These 3 Digital Banking Services

Community banks have a lot of advantages over their larger counterparts, but that’s no reason to slack on technology. Regardless of the size of the bank, consumers expect certain digital banking services. Luckily for smaller banks and credit unions, the latest Benchmarks reveal that most households and businesses assume smaller institutions have about the same quality digital tools as the largest banks. Beyond delivering amazing customer service and employing strong community engagement practices, be sure these digital banking services are up to speed:

  1. Mobile Banking

A rapidly growing percent of consumers want everything accessible on a mobile device. The latest CES Banking Benchmarks reveal that 64% of consumers expect to increase their mobile and online banking in the next 12 months. Although you want your customers to feel comfortable coming into the branch, they shouldn’t have to come in for routine transactions if they don’t want to. Remote transfer, bill pay, and remote deposit have grown by up to 35% per year at some of the more proactive institutions. Person-to-person (P2P) payments are also more popular than ever, with friends using Venmo and PayPal to cover a shared cab rather than exchange cash. It’s essential that your mobile app can communicate with the preferred apps of your consumers, making every monetary transaction as easy as possible.

  1. Financial Planning

Consumers want more from their bank than the exchange of money. Financial planning is high on the list of what community banks should be offering, and this shouldn’t be limited to an in-person visit with a representative. Give your consumers the freedom to use files stored on their personal devices to make comparisons with your website or app. Budgeting, loan calculators, and tax preparation are only a few financial planning tools that are valuable to your customers. And once they start using these tools with your bank, they are far more likely to use your value-added services in the future.

  1. Online Account Management

Community banks can’t afford to forget about basic account management services. There’s nothing more annoying than having to fill out paperwork for something like a change of mailing address when it should be something the customer can do online. Allow your consumers the flexibility to make changes to their account digitally, without the hassle of paperwork or a trip to your branch. It should be easy to change contact information, switch mailing addresses, and check balances of different accounts. It may seem like common sense, especially since convenience is valuable to your consumer base, but these basic functions are often overlooked or not properly developed.

Bank technology is easily available, and it doesn’t take much to implement tools that make a difference to your customers.  An oft-forgotten aspect of employing banking technology is how important it is to educate your own employees on how to use them.  If your employees do not know how to use the technology you offer your customers, you can be assured that your customers question how good your bank really is if the employees don’t know how to bank there. During the interviews CES conducts for the Benchmarks, we see thousands of comments from customers who question the quality of their bank when they believe the bank’s staff themselves are not expert users of the banks’ technology.

An investment in digital banking services is no longer an option if your community bank wants to remain competitive. Community banks should always leverage their unique position as a member of the local community, but they must also deliver the level of functionality consumers expect from every bank large or small.

There is enormous opportunity for you to grow your community bank or credit union, but it starts with knowing what existing customers and prospects think of you compared to your competitors. Take action now and request our benchmark study for your region.

Winners & Losers

2.28 Million Northeast Households and Businesses to Switch Banks this Year

Banking New England Sept/Oct 2018
Published on Oct 16, 2018

In this special marketing issue, learn how to optimize your mobile site, understand why customers can be easily enticed to switch banks, and get an inside look at the New England Financial Marketing Association conference, featuring an article by Bruce Paul.

How Community Banks Can Capitalize on Advantages to Beat Big Banks

Community banks are constantly competing against big banks. To remain relevant, it’s critical that community banks find and capitalize on the competitive edge their unique positions offer. It’s impossible to play the same game as big banks and expect to win. However, with a unique strategy that leverages the advantages offered by community banks and credit unions, customers can be drawn to a local choice.

Community banks can offer customized services for a better banking experience.

Larger banks do what they can to provide a well-rounded service, but it’s a cookie-cutter approach that forces local branches of large banks to conform across regions, not taking into account differences in the local communities they serve. Large banks are rarely attuned to the needs of the individual banking customer, focusing more on quantity than quality. But customers of every generation, from Baby Boomers to Generation Zers, want a trusted financial advisor. They don’t want a pamphlet on services or a web page on APRs. They want their bank to know who they are and what they personally need to do to improve and manage their finances.

Continue reading “How Community Banks Can Capitalize on Advantages to Beat Big Banks”

Community Bank Challenges: Is Technology Your Achilles’ Heel?

Community banks and credit unions often believe their strengths lie anywhere but with technology. Given the variety of personal interactions in demand by customers, it may seem unlikely that technology shortcomings would be harmful. Unfortunately, even the best customer service cannot make up for a lack of the tech-based services that customers expect in their desire to make transactional banking easier and faster. Yet, most community banks and credit unions do have the technology they need to compete. So where is the issue?

Technology is rarely the problem.

Technology is rarely the problem, but how it is implemented and presented to customers certainly can be. A community bank may think that a basic technology package is all they need, but you can’t just introduce technology and walk away. While offering online banking services and mobile banking services is important, your customers must know how to use the technology, or it can become a source of frustration, causing some customers to defect.

Continue reading “Community Bank Challenges: Is Technology Your Achilles’ Heel?”

Hitting the Right Note with Community Bank Marketing

Community bank marketing requires a comprehensive strategy delivered to a targeted audience, but this is not as simple as replicating the marketing strategies of the banking giants. Forget about advertising the fact that you have technology that every customer expects you to have in the first place. Instead, find ways to differentiate your bank from big banks and competitor community banks. Your strategy needs to emphasize what you do best. What makes your community bank special?

Hyping technology is not effective.

The first effort many banks make with their marketing strategy is to emphasize their use of current technologies. Mobile banking and chatbots are no longer new to the banking industry, and within competitive markets, consumers don’t differentiate among which banks have what technology. They simply assume that all banks have decent technological capabilities, regardless of the size of the branch. And if you don’t, it’s to your peril.

Our ad recall research has even shown that although adults can correctly identify the intent of tech-focused bank ads like billboards, they usually can’t recall which bank the ad was for. So as a result, consumers are simply getting the message: banks are good at technology.  This results in wasted marketing dollars that could be put to better use on a more effective initiative. Your larger competitors are improving the image of technology within the banking industry, which allows community banks to benefit from the net impression that all banks have strong technology.

In addition, our Benchmarks show that technology is not even among the top 5 reasons people are dissatisfied with their current bank and want to switch. Responsiveness, getting the runaround, proactivity, and banking knowledge of the staff are all significantly more likely to drive away customers.  Don’t be fooled when a firm trying to sell you technology tells you that technology is the main reason people choose a new bank.  It simply is not the case. These firms ask consumers leading questions to get that answer. If you think about it, safety and security trumps everything else when choosing a bank, but people do not choose based upon that because they have the tacit assumption that all banks offer the same level of safety and security. Technology is now the same in market after market.  Our Benchmarks currently cover 109 markets and in over 75% of those, prospects see very little technological differentiation in most of the banks (and credit unions).

Market your community engagement.

Community banks are adept at moving their community engagement beyond donations to local charities and local sports sponsorships. But what happens when you are heavily involved in your community and no one knows it? One of the most beneficial marketing efforts you can have is to make sure people know about your involvement in the community.  This is doubly important in attracting the profitable new commercial customers.  Being a strong community contributor is a major reason you might be invited to compete for a company’s new line or loan.  True, no company will pay you an extra 400 basis points just because you support the local homeless shelter, but it can at least get you in the consideration set.

Market to the individual needs of consumers.

How are you managing individual customer relationships? By learning the habits, needs, and wants of your customers and prospects, you can provide better service by recommending products that are useful. Whether customers want to know how their spending habits are affecting their credit or how they can improve their chances of getting a loan to buy their first homes, when you deliver a personalized customer experience, you have the potential to outgrow your competitors by more than 100%.

Consumers don’t want to hear about the latest technology; they’ll assume you have it as a matter of course. What they want is to know that their banks can provide a reliable, knowledgeable service without getting the runaround to find basic answers. Rather than market technology, put your efforts towards a strategy that will have the best returns. Determine what sets your bank apart from others, and market that which is unique about how you do business.

There is enormous opportunity for you to grow your community bank or credit union, but it starts with knowing what existing customers and prospects think of you compared to your competitors. Take action now and request our benchmark study for your region.